radiographic appearance and optimal location of an enteral feeding tube

radiographic appearance and optimal location of an enteral feeding tube

An enteral feeding tube usually appears as a faintly radiopaque tube, though without a thin, densely radiopaque line along its length (seen with ETTs, NGTs, and OGTs). Compared to NGT/OGTs, enteral feeding tubes are more narrow in caliber. Some, but not all, enteral feeding tubes have a radiopaque marker at their tip. The optimal location of an enteral feeding tube tip is beyond the gastric pylorus within the duodenum, optimally at the duodenojejunal junction (ligament of Treitz). On a frontal radiograph, the tube generally curves to follow the C-shaped loop of the duodenum, and on a lateral radiograph, the tube curves posteriorly from the gastric antrum and first portion of the duodenum as it enters the retroperitoneal second portion of the duodenum

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