Bleeding After Dental Procedures

Bleeding After Dental Procedures-How much is common

A certain amount of bleeding is common after some dental procedures. You have a higher risk of bleeding after a dental procedure if you are taking medicine to prevent your blood from clotting (blood thinner medicine).

Before having any dental procedures, including routine cleanings, tell your dental care provider about:

  • All of your health problems.
  • All medicines and supplements that you are taking.

Your dental care provider should talk with your health care provider before stopping any blood thinner medicine that you are taking. Stopping your medicine could lead to serious health problems such as a heart attack or stroke.

What dental procedures raise my risk of bleeding?

Some dental procedures that may cause bleeding include:

  • Teeth cleaning (prophylaxis).
  • Deep teeth cleaning (scaling and root planing).
  • Gum (periodontal) surgery.
  • Tooth removal (extraction).
  • Dental implant placement.
  • Removal of tissue for testing (biopsy).

Dental procedures do not always cause bleeding in every person. Blood mixes with saliva, so there may seem to be more bleeding than there really is.

How is this treated?

If your bleeding is severe, your dental care provider may:

  • Place a surgical sponge or bandage (dressing) over the area that is bleeding.
  • Clean the area and close your wound with stitches (sutures).
  • Use an electrical device (cautery) or a laser to stop bleeding.
  • Prescribe or apply a medicine to help control bleeding.

Follow these instructions at home:

  • For 24 hours after your procedure or longer:
    • Do notspit or rinse your mouth.
    • Do notdrink hot beverages.
    • Do notdrink with a straw.
    • Do notuse any products that contain nicotine or tobacco, such as cigarettes and e-cigarettes. If you need help quitting, ask your healthcare provider.
  • Do noteat hard foods or foods with sharp edges during the first 2–3 days after your procedure. These foods include nuts, pretzels, and chips.
  • Bite down firmly on moist gauze over the area for at least 30 minutes after the procedure. If bleeding does not stop after that time, continue biting firmly on moist gauze or a tea bag for 30 more minutes, or as long as your health care provider recommends.
  • Take over the counter and prescription medicines only as told by your health care provider.

Keep all follow-up visits as told by your health care provider. This is important.

Contact a health care provider if:

  • Your bleeding gets worse, is severe, or does not stop.
  • You have a large blood clot where the bleeding stopped.
  • You have a fever.

Get help right away if:

  • You have chest pain.
  • You have trouble breathing.
  • You feel light-headed, dizzy, or confused.
  • You have trouble speaking.

These symptoms may be an emergency. Do not wait to see if the symptoms will go away. Get medical help right away. Call your local emergency services (911 in the U.S.). Do not drive yourself to the hospital.

Summary

  • A certain amount of bleeding is common after some dental procedures.
  • You may be able to stop the bleeding on your own. If you cannot stop the bleeding, contact your dental care provider or your health care provider.
  • You have a higher risk of bleeding after a dental procedure if you are taking medicine to prevent your blood from clotting (blood thinner medicine).
  • Talk with your health care provider before stopping any blood thinner medicine that you are taking. Stopping your medicine could lead to serious health problems such as a heart attack or stroke.
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