Vitamin E

Vitamin E Brand Names

  • Alph-E-Mixed
  • Aquasol E
  • Aquavite-E

What is Vitamin E?

Vitamin E is a vitamin found in nature. It is added to a healthy diet to prevent or to treat low vitamin E levels.

Vitamin E is a fat soluble vitamin found in many foods including vegetable oils, wheat germ, cereal grains, fruits, green vegetables, meat, eggs, and certain types of fish.

The term ‘vitamin E’ actually represents a group of 8 different tocopherols, lipid-soluble compounds that are synthesized by plants and required by most animals, including humans.

Of these, d-alpha-tocopherol is the naturally occurring form with the greatest vitamin activity.

The synthetic form is dl-alpha-tocopherol. Commercial vitamin E preparations are formulated primarily from synthetic dl-alpha-tocopheryl acetate.

This acetate ester confers stability to the compound but is less active than the natural form. Vitamin E deficiency is rare given the amounts found in normal dietary foods.

Supplementation may be required in patients who suffer from malabsorptive disorders such as fat malabsorption syndrome, cystic fibrosis, chronic bowel disease (e.g., Crohn’s, Celiac, and Whipple’s disease), or who have undergone certain gastrointestinal surgeries (e.g., gastrectomy or gastric bypass).

In children, the use of vitamin E is primarily in the form of supplementation to maintain adequate intakes to prevent deficiency.

Pure vitamin E was first isolated from wheat germ oil in 1936, and its chemical structure was defined and synthesis achieved in 1938.

The first time vitamin E was recognized by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Research Council was in 1968. Systemic vitamin E was approved by the FDA in 1941. In addition to oral vitamin E formulations used for supplementation, several topical formulations of vitamin E are also available.

Topical vitamin E formulations have been used off-label with claims of protective antioxidant effects against photoaging.

The FDA has not evaluated these claims, and the ability of topical Vitamin E products to aid in the healing of minor burns and sunburns has not been substantiated.

Indications

  1. Alzheimer’s disease
  2. facial wrinkles
  3. familial hypocholesterolemia
  4. hot flashes
  5. mastalgia
  6. menopause
  7. nutritional supplementation
  8. photoaging
  9. premenstrual syndrome (PMS)
  10. tardive dyskinesia
  11. vitamin E deficiency

Side Effects of Vitamin E

  1. bleeding
  2. blurred vision
  3. contact dermatitis
  4. diarrhea
  5. enterocolitis
  6. fatigue
  7. headache
  8. infection
  9. nausea
  10. rash
  11. skin irritation

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

-allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

-changes in vision

-dizzy with headache

-unusual bleeding or bruising

-unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

-nausea

-stomach upset or gas

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this Vitamin E?

They need to know if you have any of the following conditions:

-anemia

-bleeding problems

-history of stoke

-low vitamin K levels in the body

-recent surgery

-an unusual or allergic reaction to vitamin E, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

-pregnant or trying to get pregnant

-breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the package label. For best results take this vitamin with food. Take your vitamin at regular intervals. Do not take your vitamin more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • Amprenavir
  • Castor Oil
  • Cholestyramine
  • Colesevelam
  • Colestipol
  • Mineral Oil
  • Orlistat
  • Selumetinib
  • Sodium Hyaluronate, Hyaluronic Acid
  • Tipranavir
  • Warfarin

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Follow a good diet. Taking a vitamin supplement does not replace the need for a balanced diet. Some foods that have this vitamin naturally are cereal grains, fruits, green leafy vegetables, vegetable oils, and wheat germ oil.

Too much of this vitamin can be unsafe. Talk to your doctor or health care provider about how much is right for you.

If you are scheduled for any medical or dental procedure, tell your healthcare provider that you are taking this vitamin. You may need to stop taking it before the procedure.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

-allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

-changes in vision

-dizzy with headache

-unusual bleeding or bruising

-unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

-nausea

-stomach upset or gas

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 85 degrees F). Protect from heat and light. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

Monitoring Parameters

  • laboratory monitoring not necessary

Contraindications

  • anticoagulant therapy
  • breast-feeding
  • ocular exposure
  • pregnancy
  • premature neonates
  • vitamin K deficiency

Disclaimer: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.

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