Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS)

What is this term Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS)

Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance is a condition in which there is too much of a protein called monoclonal protein, or M protein, in the blood. MGUS can cause you to have too many cells in your blood and not enough space for healthy cells. This condition may increase your risk of developing multiple myeloma or other blood disorders in the future.

What are the causes?

The exact reason of this condition is unknown.

What increases the risk?

You are more likely to develop this condition if:

  • You are African American.
  • You are age 50 or older.
  • You are male.
  • You have an autoimmune disease.
  • You have been exposed to radiation.
  • You have a family history of MGUS.

What are the signs or symptoms?

There are no symptoms of this condition.

How is this diagnosed?

This condition may be diagnosed with a blood test that checks for M protein.

How is this treated?

Treatment for this condition may involve:

  • Having regular exams. This will help your physician to monitor your health.
  • Having tests done regularly, such as:
    • Blood tests to check for M protein in your body.
    • Imaging tests, such as a CT scan.
    • Bone marrow biopsy. This is the test where a sample of bone marrow is taken from your body and examined under a microscope.

Follow these instructions at home:

  • Keep all follow-up visits as told by your health care provider. This is important.

Contact a health care provider if:

  • You have trouble swallowing.
  • You have pain in your back or ribs.
  • You have a fever.
  • You are bruising easily.

Get help right away if:

  • You break a bone.
  • You have trouble breathing.

Take Home points

  • Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance is a disorder in which there is too much of a protein called monoclonal protein, or M protein, in the blood.
  • This condition may be diagnosed with a blood test that checks for M protein.
  • Treatment for this condition may involve having tests done regularly. Diagnosis includes blood tests, imaging tests, and a bone marrow biopsy.