Are there requirements that would limit certain patients from being able to do Peritoneal Dialysis

Are there requirements that would limit certain patients from being able to do Peritoneal Dialysis?

PD is typically performed in the home, a setting in which either the patient or home caregiver is responsible for setup, connections, and execution of the treatment. While this may limit the ability of certain patients with visual, tactile, or motor restrictions from performing PD on their own, for most patients, “where there is a will, there is a way.” Patients are enabled by the flexibility to do either continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) or automated peritoneal dialysis (APD; see definitions that follow), family and/or caregivers (i.e., see the section on “Assisted Peritoneal Dialysis” that follows), and PD nursing teams knowledgeable about innovative care accessories that help overcome most limitations. Notably, many nursing homes offer PD, offloading any burden from the patient. Similarly, while space limitations or the presence of pets (i.e., cats) may at first seem to be a barrier to PD use, smaller, more frequent home supply deliveries and the use of CAPD, respectively, help circumvent these issues. PD should ideally be performed in a dedicated area of the living quarters that is kept clean (not sterile), and is free from blowing dust or dander.

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